Monthly Archives: March 2015

BecA-ILRI Hub hosts aflatoxin research platform towards safe food and feed in Africa

Originally posted on AgHealth:
Aflatoxin-contaminated groundnut kernels from Mozambique (photo credit: IITA). ? Among the many research projects carried out by the Food Safety and Zoonoses program of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) is one that aims to reduce the…

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Safe food, fair food: Making milk and meat safe and affordable for the world’s poor

Originally posted on ILRI Clippings:
Demand for milk and meat continues to rise in developing countries (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann). The New Agriculturist recently reported on a Safe Food, Fair Food Project led by scientists at the International Livestock Research…

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Livestock in poor countries need drugs to stay alive and productive, but how to avoid the rise of ‘super bugs’?

Originally posted on ILRI Clippings:
Woman feeds her milk cow in Embu, Kenya (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann). Developing-country livestock keepers need more and better drugs to keep their animals alive and productive, and there are increasing numbers of livestock in the…

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The Budongo Forest Landscape: Diets, Food Security and Nutrition

Around the Budongo forest, expanding sugarcane production, the establishment of tree plantations and forest loss have altered the landscape. In this rural area where nearly all households have a ho… Source: canwefeedtheworld.wordpress.com See on Scoop.it – Agriculture, Climate & Food … Continue reading

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New paper on parasitic infections shows the benefits of co-infections with the ‘mild cousins’ of important pathogens

Originally posted on ILRI Clippings:
An animal vaccinated against East Coast fever, as shown by its ear tag (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann). Herds of African cattle may hold the secret to new ways of fighting parasitic diseases like malaria, which…

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Insects in feed: What do consumers think?

Over 70% of consumers would eat fish, chicken or pork from animals fed on a diet containing insect protein, earlier studies revealed. The EU funded project PROteINSECT is now asking EU consumers again if they are accepting animal products that … Continue reading

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Smallholder Farmers and Agricultural Value Chains: What Is the Policy Relevance?

A new article (ungated version here) in World Development crystallized a few of the thoughts I have been mulling over regarding contract farming and the participation of smallholders in agricultural value chains in developing countries–an area where I have done a … Continue reading

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A Modest Proposal for Feeding Africa

Originally posted on One Billion Hungry: Can We Feed the World?:
In his recently released annual letter, Bill Gates has made a series of “big bets” for development. One of these bets, that Africa will be able to feed itself…

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Capacity development for sustainable food security: Role of public private partnerships

Originally posted on CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish:
Capacity development and public private partnership are hailed as global policy priorities in the draft sustainable development goals outcome document and the UN secretary general’s synthesis report provides guidance on…

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Are the Foods You Buy at the Farmers Market Safer than Other Foods?

For the past year or so, I have been working on a paper with my colleague Rob King which I am hoping to debut sometime soon in which we look at the relationship between farmers markets and food-borne illness. I … Continue reading

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The International Development bill passes and 0.7% spending on international aid becomes law

Originally posted on One Billion Hungry: Can We Feed the World?:
Recently the UK passed a bill which enshrines in law their commitment to spend 0.7% of gross national income (GNI) on aid every year, a target first reached by…

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From Sand of Arabia to Lush green Western World ~ The Journey of Camel Milk; Autism Fector

Originally posted on Natural Health with the Camel Milk:
The camel milk is finding its way in the new world  (from sand dunes of Arabia to the western world) because of its hidden treasures of health promising ingredients. Traditionally used…

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Traditional Use of Camel Milk and Liver Health (Hepatitis)

Originally posted on Natural Health with the Camel Milk:
Traditionally camel milk had been using for the treatment of many complex and diverse ailments of the pastoral communities of Baloch Pashtun tribes. These camel pastoralists camel pastoralists use camel milk…

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Strange Animal with Special Traits ~ My Camel

Originally posted on Small Scaled Farmers and the pastoralists are the backbones of animal agriculture. They play a pivotal role not only in producing quality food item but also conserving the genetic resources as well as nature for the next generations. Contrast to the factory farming small scaled farming and pastoralism do not use (up to their level best) pesticides and chemical fertilizers etc. They do not harm the nature by the blind use of inputs like energy and water. They are the custodians of the genes and nature.:
Camel is integral part of the deserted ecosystems and blessed with special traits/characteristics which give strange…

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A Blend of Indigenous Knowledge and Native Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture Ensure Food Security

Originally posted on Small Scaled Farmers and the pastoralists are the backbones of animal agriculture. They play a pivotal role not only in producing quality food item but also conserving the genetic resources as well as nature for the next generations. Contrast to the factory farming small scaled farming and pastoralism do not use (up to their level best) pesticides and chemical fertilizers etc. They do not harm the nature by the blind use of inputs like energy and water. They are the custodians of the genes and nature.:
I am Raziq belong to the remote and the poorly infra-structured area of Pakistan named as…

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Small-scale Farming Ensures Multi-Dimensional Outcomes

Originally posted on Small Scaled Farmers and the pastoralists are the backbones of animal agriculture. They play a pivotal role not only in producing quality food item but also conserving the genetic resources as well as nature for the next generations. Contrast to the factory farming small scaled farming and pastoralism do not use (up to their level best) pesticides and chemical fertilizers etc. They do not harm the nature by the blind use of inputs like energy and water. They are the custodians of the genes and nature.:
Small-scale livestock production is based on subsistence foundations. Such livestock keepers keep mostly their indigenous livestock…

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Challenges of Climate Change~ Camels’ Adaptation Strategy is Overwhelmingly Useful

Originally posted on Natural Health with the Camel Milk:
Camel has adapted mechanisms that allow it to withstand prolonged water deprivation, high temperature, especially in the absence of readily available water, and survive when feed resources are scarce or of…

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The Camel Soul

Originally posted on Natural Health with the Camel Milk:
Camel is a cool, happy and calm animal. Opposite to common believing as dangerous, this unique creature has a soul with love and remembrance. Camel realize the feelings of a person…

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Camel Ensures Sustainable Productivity

Originally posted on Natural Health with the Camel Milk:
The atrocities of climate change are emerging with multi-dimensional outcomes in different parts of the world with different intensities and level of losses. The historical Bactria region1 (Also, Arya) is one of…

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Camel is important in climate change scenario

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Sustainable Use and Conservation of Natural Resources for Future Generations

Originally posted on Traditional Animal Genetic Resources for Food Security Under Climate Change Influence:
Water is one of the precious and the most needed natural resource in our daily life 1. Life without water is unable to think about. The…

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ComAcross Participatory Epidemiology Training: Infectious Fun

Originally posted on PENAPH:
The ComAcross Project is supporting a training initiative in Participatory Epidemiology (PE) in South East Asia to contribute to skills development useful in for the implementation of One Health approaches in the region. PE takes a…

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#IWD2015: Why do we need a gender perspective in research to improve food safety in informal markets?

Originally posted on AgHealth:
A woman milks one of her goats in Ségou District, Mali (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné). Almost two-thirds of the world’s 925 million poor livestock keepers are rural women, and women often predominate in urban agriculture.…

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Mixed-participant training promotes joint action by farmers and development agents

Originally posted on LIVES-Ethiopia:
Farmers and development agents getting a practical training on apple tree management and scion selection in Holeta (photo credit: ILRILIVES). The Livestock and Irrigation Value Chains for Ethiopian Smallholders (LIVES) project is testing different training approaches and…

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The Budongo Forest Landscape: Sugarcane, food security and household wealth

Originally posted on One Billion Hungry: Can We Feed the World?:
The Budongo Forest Landscape, in western Uganda, has, in the recent past, seen a marked change in the land cover, predominantly from forest to sugarcane. The expansion of sugarcane…

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Using the gender lens in agricultural research and development: Why does it matter?

Originally posted on ILRI policies, instititions and livelihoods program:
The International Women’s day is commemorated worldwide on 8 March each year. ‘Make it happen’ is the 2015 theme. Towards this day, this blog will feature stories of partners collaborating with the International…

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Healthy Food for a Healthy World: Food as Medicine—the Link between Nutrition and Health | Chicago Council on Global Affairs

“Healthy Food for a Healthy World,” aims to build awareness about the important role food can play in promoting health and alleviating malnutrition.  We will publish one blog post each week exploring these issues, and the series will culminate in … Continue reading

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MORE MUST BE DONE TO REFORM GLOBAL FOOD SYSTEM TO FIGHT CRISIS (UNNews / WFP / W. VAN COTTHEM)

Originally posted on DESERTIFICATION:
Read at : UNNews MORE MUST BE DONE TO REFORM GLOBAL FOOD SYSTEM TO FIGHT CRISIS, SAYS UN EXPERT New York, Sep 18 2009 10:05AM Investing in agriculture alone will not solve the food crisis, a…

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BOOSTING FOOD PRODUCTION ALONE WILL NOT SOLVE HUNGER CRISIS (UNNews)

Originally posted on DESERTIFICATION:
BOOSTING FOOD PRODUCTION ALONE WILL NOT SOLVE HUNGER CRISIS – UN EXPERT New York, May  7 2009  1:00PM An independent United Nations expert warned today that ramping up food production on its own would not alleviate…

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We won’t solve hunger and stop climate change with industrial farming on large plantations (African Agriculture)

Originally posted on DESERTIFICATION:
============== Read at : http://www.africanagricultureblog.com/2011/03/un-report-reveals-overwhelming-benefits.html UN report reveals overwhelming benefits of eco-farming? by Brigid Darragh The latest report out from the United Nations reveals farmers in developing nations can double food production in ten years’ time…

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