Thesis opportunities | Foodscapes in times of uncertainty

Rural Sociology Wageningen University

The CSPS Foodscapes cluster is looking for BSc and MSc students interested in researching emerging foodscapes in times of uncertainty.

Covid-19 has displayed many of the vulnerabilities and externalities of our current corporate food regime, such as unequal access to food, the dependence of our food supply on global supply chains, the exploitation of (migrant) workers in agricultural and food sectors and the fragility of the ‘just-in-time’ supply logistics. While the current crisis displays these vulnerabilities, also food practices and initiatives are arising that might provide seeds for ‘other futures’.

What foodscapes are emerging during Covid-19? What seeds do those emergent foodscapes provide for more sustainable, equitable, inclusive and fair foodscapes? And how can we potentially build on those seeds to make ‘other futures’ more real?

If you are interested in researching these, or related, questions, please contact Anke de Vrieze (RSO), anke.devrieze@wur.nl or Mustafa Hasanov (BMO), mustafa.hasanov@wur.nl. We…

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7 Points that Convince you of Consuming the Camel Milk

The awareness and sensitivity are increasing about the different food items among the people. The people are turning from junk to the real and natural food. The camel milk (CaM) is one of the important natural foods, enriched with super molecules, making it a food of choice for food sensitive people. CaM has unique properties, revitalizing our bodies and making us stronger and resilient against the stress and toxins of our environments. It revitalizes our bodies after sicknesses, stress, and hard work. In this article, I have tried to compile the camel milk story in 7 points to better understand this natural treasure of the food.

7 Points that Convince you of Consuming the Camel Milk
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The Best Probiotic? Fruits and Vegetables. – The Atlantic

The Best Probiotics An apple contains about 100 million bacteria—a more diverse range than any dietary supplement. JAMES HAMBLIN AUG 7, 2019 CHARLES PLATIAU / REUTERS In April, researchers at Tufts University posed a nutrition riddle. They compared people who took vitamin pills with people who got the same nutrients the old-fashioned way, by eating food. Tracking […]

The Best Probiotic? Fruits and Vegetables. – The Atlantic
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Camel Milk Provides Healthier Gut Microbiome

Where our Immune System is Generated? A strong and healthy immune system is now more critical than ever because of ever-increasing infections in our surroundings. There are many reasons for the widespread infections, mostly because of climate change. So need a very strong and responsive immune system to safeguard our health from such infections. Our […]

Camel Milk Provides Healthier Gut Microbiome
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Lessons on tackling the growing risk of emerging infectious diseases in Africa

AgHealth

Cows walk along an irrigation canal in Niolo, Mali (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

As part of a special COVID-19 series by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Bernard Bett and Delia Randolph of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and John McDermott of IFPRI write on the growing risk in Africa of pathogens that spread from animals to people and how we can learn from past epidemics to improve preparedness and response.

In their article, the scientists discuss the evolving patterns of emergence and spread of zoonotic pathogens, factors that might influence the spread of emerging zoonotic pathogens and the opportunities for controlling emerging infectious diseases in Africa.

They write: “The record thus far on COVID-19 and on past disease outbreaks shows that early, effective and sustained response is essential to winning the battle over these diseases. Innovative use of information and communication tools and platforms and engagement of local communities are crucial to improved disease surveillance and effective response. Building these…

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Food Security and Nutrition: Building a global narrative towards 2030 (NEW REPORT)

Food Governance

The latest report of the High Level Panel of Experts (HLPE) on Food Security and Nutrition has just been released.

Key messages from the Report are:

i. There is an urgent need for strengthening and consolidating conceptual thinking around FSN to prioritize the right to food, to widen our understanding of food security and to adopt a food systems analytical and policy framework.

ii. FSN outcomes in recent years show the extent to which the global community is falling short on Agenda 2030 targets, especially SDG 2, and that food systems face a range of challenges – and some opportunities – linked to major trends in the drivers of food system change.

iii. Policy approaches and actions for FSN, in light of the diverse challenges
facing food systems, will require critical policy shifts and support for enabling conditions that uphold all dimensions of food security.

Download the full Report (available…

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Why the Camel Milk is Anti-Infectious or Immunity Booster?

Traditional Animal Genetic Resources for Food Security Under Climate Change Influence

Camel is very unique and special creature, blessed with very unique charecteristics. As the camel is unique and incredible, the same are the products of camel, especially the camel milk. Traditionally, camel milk had been using for the cure of complex ailments in the long periods of the history. Now, the different scientific studies are being conducted and many are underway to explore the magic powers of camel milk and to find the molecules in camel milk which materializing the healing of different diseases.

I hereby give some exemples of the precious molecules found in the camel milk which are incredibly work for the curing of the complex health ailments. One of the best example is the immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulins of the camel milk combat autoimmune diseases by strengthen the immune system, and can fight some bacteria like tuberculosis and protect the body from bacterial and viral infections.

Camel…

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New study sheds light on early intensification of smallholder backyard poultry farming systems

AgHealth

Alpha chickens on a farm in Isiokpo, Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/ACGG Nigeria).

Poultry production is an important contributor to the livelihoods of rural populations, especially in low- and middle-income countries. As poultry production in these countries remains dominated by backyard systems with low inputs and low outputs, considerable yield gaps exist.

Intensification of these backyard poultry farming systems can increase productivity, production and income. This process is relatively recent in low- and middle-income countries compared to high-income countries. The management practices and constraints that smallholder farmers face in scaling-up their production, in the early stages of intensification, are poorly understood and described.

To shed more light on these aspects of intensification of poultry farming in low-income settings, a team of scientists investigated the features of the small-scale commercial chicken sector in a rural area distant from major production centres. Their study findings are published in the journal Animal(24 June 2020). 

The study surveyed 111 commercial chicken farms in Kenya in 2016…

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Camel Milk and Addition of New Products to the Dairy Industry

Camel milk, in particular, is a very unique and healthy product with especially anti-allergic and anti-diabetic effects. Several studies have shown that camel milk has some therapeutic potential in both type-1 and type-2 Diabetes mellitus. – Dr Raziq

via Camel Milk and Addition of New Products to the Dairy Industry

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Camel Milk Protein Posses Bioactive Peptides

“The results of a scientific study revealed that both caseins and whey proteins of camel milk possess bioactive peptides with significant radical-scavenging activities and thus herald a fascinating opportunity for their potential as nutraceuticals or therapeutic peptides for prevention and treatment of
oxidative stress-associated diseases. The link of the article is given below.” Dr Raziq

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405654518301082?via%3Dihub

Natural Health with the Camel Milk

A medicine for Oxidative Stress Releated Diseases

Understanding about camel milk is increasing and the latest studies are coming with very appealing results. A study about the milk proteins (Casein and whey) revealed that the unique bioactive peptides of the camel milk works as a medicine for the oxidative stress associated diseases.

Ice cream made from camel milk

Study Published in the Journal of Animal Nutrition

The results of a scientific study revealed that both caseins and whey proteins of camel milk possess bioactive peptides with significant radical-scavenging activities and thus herald a fascinating opportunity for their potential as nutraceuticals or therapeutic peptides for prevention and treatment of
oxidative stress-associated diseases. The link of the article is given below. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405654518301082?via%3Dihub

The author is advocating camel milk with the theme of camel4life and sharing the happenings in the camels’ world. This piece is just a small step to aware the masses…

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Food safety: How can consumers make a difference?

A food safety project in Ethiopia is exploring how consumer demand can contribute towards improving food safety in the country’s informal markets.

Food safety: How can consumers make a difference?
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Food safety: How can consumers make a difference?

A food safety project in Ethiopia is exploring how consumer demand can contribute towards improving food safety in the country’s informal markets.

Food safety: How can consumers make a difference?
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Food safety: How can consumers make a difference?

AgHealth

Fruit and vegetables on sale alongside other food items in a local market in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Geraldine Klarenberg).

African food systems are dominated by informal markets, typically open-air markets found at designated sites and street corners, which often have poor hygiene and are subject to limited or poor regulation. Occasionally there are calls for these informal markets to be banned, but most consumers depend on them as they are more accessible and affordable than formal markets.

As we celebrate World Food Safety Day on 7 June 2020, it is crucial that governments recognize the importance of better food safety in informal markets. One way to encourage them to take food safety seriously is by harnessing the power of consumer demand.

Foodborne diseases cause a massive health burden and remain a persistent impediment to socio-economic development. The World Health Organization estimates that close to 600 million people fall ill and 420,000 die every year from foodborne diseases worldwide. Children under five years of age make up 125,000 of those…

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EU Farm to Fork Strategy: Collective response from food sovereignty scholars

Despite the fact that “F2F Strategy does not go far enough to ensuring diverse, sustainable and just food systems for all in the EU” Retallack (2013) was of the opinion that “Emerging evidence indicates that holistic management, aligned with agroecological principles, has a number of positive environmental impacts, including soil regeneration and carbon sequestration, fire prevention and biodiversity increases.”

Retallack, G. (2013) ‘Global Cooling by Grassland Soils of the Geological Past and Near Future’ in Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci.

Food Governance

On 20 May 2020 the European Commission (EC) released its new Farm to Fork (F2F) Strategy for a fair, healthy and environmentally-friendly food system. As scholars committed to supporting sustainable food system transformation, we commend the EC for delivering a  longer term vision, and proposing the development of a legislative framework for sustainable food systems by 2023. Binding mechanisms and coherent, integrated rights-based legislative frameworks are fundamental to ensuring compliance and meeting the proposed targets. We acknowledge that the F2F Strategy contains many positive points, but are deeply concerned that these remain embedded in an outdated framework.

The evidence overwhelmingly points to a need to move beyond the (green) economic growth paradigm. This paradigm, reified by the European Green Deal, perpetuates unsustainable lock-ins and entrenched inequalities. The Scientific Advice Mechanism[1] recently advised the EC to stop treating food as a commodity and start thinking about the implications of seeing food…

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EU Farm to Fork Strategy: Collective response from food sovereignty scholarsby foodgovernance

https://widgets.wp.com/likes/index.html?ver=20190321#

Despite the fact that “F2F Strategy does not go far enough to ensuring diverse, sustainable and just food systems for all in the EU”

According to Retallack (2013) “Emerging evidence indicates that holistic management, aligned with agroecological principles, has a number of positive environmental impacts, including soil regeneration and carbon sequestration, fire prevention and biodiversity increases.”

Retallack, G. (2013) ‘Global Cooling by Grassland Soils of the Geological Past and Near Future’ in Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci.

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How planting a garden can boost bees, local food and resilience during the coronavirus crisis… #Covid19 #nutritionalsecurity

With the arrival of spring, many people have been starting to think about how COVID-19 will impact the affordability and availability of fruits and vegetables in coming months, as shortages of both honeybees and migrant workers threaten crop pollination and the food that comes with it. The current global pandemic has highlighted the many ways our agricultural systems are […]

How planting a garden can boost bees, local food and resilience during the coronavirus crisis
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EU Proposes 2030 Goal to Reduce Pesticide Use by 50% and Increase Arable Land in Organic Production by At Least 17%

(Beyond Pesticides, May 26, 2020) Across the pond, the European Commission (EC) has announced plans to protect biodiversity and build a more sustainable food system, and identified the reduction of pesticide use  and the expansion of organic agriculture as pillars of the scheme. The EC expects that the initiative, which will require EU member states’ endorsement, will advance […]

EU Proposes 2030 Goal to Reduce Pesticide Use by 50% and Increase Arable Land in Organic Production by At Least 17%
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#Covid19: Deaths and Infections by Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) will continue to be LOW in Africa by Prof Marte

Professor Isa Marte Hussaini, FAAS, FAS, FNAPharm, FPSN

Contrary to the projections of World Health Organization (WHO) and Western Countries, Africa will not be devastated by COVID-19. The testing levels in Africa are far below those in Europe and USA which may be responsible for the low incidences. However, the percent fatality rates are maintained between 1-3% even after 3 months of the pandemic. In Nigeria, the fatality rate was highest (3.57%) on 02/05/2020 and is now below 2.9% after 3 months (March- May). The following reasons may be responsible for the low incidence and fatality in Africa:

  1. The African population is very young based on our lower average life expectancy (61 years for males and 65 for females) compared with Asia, Europe or North America. In West Africa, it is 56 years (2019). The ages below these averages of life expectancy have relatively good immune systems and low numbers of patients with co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus, asthma and heart diseases compared with those over 70 years. This strongly suggests that the African Governments should focus and protect the few elderly citizens (above 60 years) and those with co-morbidities who are more vulnerable to COVID-19.
  2. Africans have more Vitamin D3 than Caucasians and Asians because of abundance of sun light in the continent. Vitamin D3 is an immune booster which protects Africans from coronavirus disease. Few Africans with low Vitamin D, require additional intake of D3.
  3. In Africa, the frequency of exposures to bacteria and viruses is very high because of the poor hygiene conditions. This may lead to generation of specific antibodies (IgG) in Africans to different diseases, including coronaviruses (SARS CoV-1 &2) which may make the African immune system much stronger than that of a Caucasian or Asian. This is an excellent research area for African Scientists to find out whether there is antibody cross- reactivity between SARS-CoV 1 and 2. Can antibody against SARS-CoV-1 protect patients from COVID-19 caused by SARS CoV-2? There is information in the literature that antibody against Mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK1/2; erk1/erk2) cross-react with both proteins.

One, two or all three of the stated facts may make the African continent hostile to SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of COVID-19. As a precaution, the African Governments should not be complacent in taking proactive and preventive measures to stop the spread of the virus. The use of face masks, sanitizers, washing of hands as well as social distancing should be encouraged during this pandemic. In addition, Governments must also strengthen contact-tracing committees in various states to act immediately and quarantine all contacts once a COVID-19 case is confirmed. This will put a break to community transmission of COVID-19.

Research and Development (R&D) in Africa.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the poor state and unpreparedness of most of African Healthcare Systems. The lack of capacity of R&D in most African countries is also apparent except for Senegal and South Africa. The African Governments should now think outside the box and build the continent’s R&D capacity instead of relying on foreign vaccine development and treatments for diseases. The continent has smart and intelligent people who are well-trained and positioned to develop vaccines and drugs for diseases. All the African Researchers need is the enabling environment and funding.

We have successfully used the following combination to prevent and treat COVID-19 patients. Some of the patients tested positive and were in the isolation center when the preparations were given to them. The quarantined patients were all discharged and did not develop any symptoms of COVID-19. The prophylactic use of the preparations was also successful. The dosage and usage are:

  • Black Caraway (Nigella sativa) Seed Oil 1 teaspoonful 3 times daily (immunity booster, Anti-inflammatory, anti-histaminic, anti-bacterial and anti-viral activities). We have determined the safety level of Black seed oil at this dose level and is very safe.
  • Vitamin D3 1000 IU daily (Immunity booster, anti-inflammatory and prevents clot formation).
  • Aspirin 75 (UK brand) or 81 (US brand) mg daily (prevents clot formation). Aspirin at this dose level selectively blocks the formation of thromboxane A2 in platelets without affecting the production of prostacyclin by the endothelium. This selective inhibitory property of low dose aspirin prevents platelets from aggregation and sticking together to form thrombus, which is recently found in COVID-19 Patient’s.

The three preparations were given for 10-14 days for treatment of COVID-19. On a personal note, I have been taking Vitamin D3 and aspirin 81 mg for the past 10 years to boost my immune system and prevent thrombus formation.

The study we have carried out involved in both prevention and treatment has a sample size of 30. There is the need to increase the sample size. It is now up to the Ministry of Health and NAFDAC to finance and carry out multi-centre Clinical Trials involving thousands of COVID-19 patients for this treatment regimen.

May mankind be saved from this terrible pandemic. Ameen

Professor Isa Marte Hussaini, FAAS, FAS, FNAPharm, FPSN

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The FG €995m Agric MECHANISATION Facility To Help Nigeria Attained Food Security And Diversify Economy

Reduction of #PostHarvestLoss and Farmer education should take center stage of any form of sustainable investment in Agriculture

“This is meant to tackle the primary issues of post-harvest losses commonly suffered by smallholder farmers as well as to domesticate efficient supply chain operations where factories or aggregation hubs are closer to sources of raw material.”

Mr. Kwasari, also disclosed that three years from now, Nigeria would be food secured for the various plant and livestock-related commodities identified to be supported by the programme across the states. –

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The relevance of agroecology, territorial solidarity and the right to food for the EU Farm to Fork Strategy

Below is the highlighted under the sub-heading ‘Vulnerable Food System· Certainly there are lessons for Nigeria 🇳🇬 to draw from this.
19 has exposed even more limits and dysfunctions in our globalized food systems: from our reliance on under-paid farm and food sector workers operating in poor working conditions (most often women and migrants), the risks associated with intensive animal farming, including zoonoses, to barriers facing small-scale producers when trying to access local markets, to gender inequalities and the additional risks faced by people with pre-existing diet-related health conditions.

Covid-19 is also set to aggravate other shocks (e.g. crop failures or abrupt changes in food prices due to climate change and other extreme events), and threats (e.g. biocultural erosion, degrading soil fertility, ageing farm population, land concentration, lack of farm renewal). These shocks and threats reveal the fragility of the European food systems, which the SAPEA report makes clear is even more vulnerable due to its interdependent nature and the fact that the EU imports large quantities of food and feed from third countries, while also being a major exporter of food”

Food Governance

On 14 May, the Nyéléni Food Sovereignty Movement in Europe and Central Asia (ECA) sent a letter to the Executive vice president of the European Commission (EC), Franz Timmermans, who is leading the European Green Deal.

A week before the release of the new Farm to Fork Strategy and EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030, the letter called on the EC to address the need to transform the food system. Sent with the letter was an Academic Brief written by Jessica Duncan, Marta Rivera-Ferre and Priscilla Claeys. The Brief reflects on insights from the recently published Scientific Advice Mechanism (SAM) and Science Advice for Policy by European Academies (SAPEA) reports on sustainable food system with a view towards key objectives of the Nyeleni ECA movement.

Academic Brief                                                 May 13, 2020

The importance of Food Sovereignty for the Farm to Fork strategyand the New Green Deal. Insights and limits…

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How unintended consequences unraveled a legendary agricultural achievement

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THE WASHINGTON POST –

By Erin Blakemore – April 18, 2020 – https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/how-unintended-consequences-unraveled-a-legendary-agricultural-achievement/2020/04/17/b62f0f04-7ff0-11ea-8013-1b6da0e4a2b7_story.html

In the 1960s and 1970s, a single farm scientist became a public hero, credited with ending famine in much of the developing world. Norman Borlaug’s Green Revolution, an agricultural method born of the high-yield crops he pioneered, was almost universally lauded.

But were his well-intentioned methods a good deed — or a dangerous trap? “The Man Who Tried to Feed the World,” on PBS’s American Experience series on Tuesday, tells the story of how unintended consequences unraveled a legendary achievement.

It’s easy to understand why Borlaug’s ideas held so much promise: The variety of wheat the scientist created resisted rust, a fungal disease that was responsible for devastating crop epidemics in the developing world. With the help of Borlaug’s hybrid wheat and plentiful water, pesticides and chemical fertilizer, farmers could produce enormous yields in places…

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Comparisons of organic and conventional agriculture need improvement, say researchers

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Phys.org
Phys. Org. – MARCH 18, 2020 – by Chalmers University of Technology
https://phys.org/news/2020-03-comparisons-conventional-agriculture.html

The environmental effects of agriculture and food are hotly debated. But the most widely used method of analysis often tends to overlook vital factors such as biodiversity, soil quality, pesticide impacts and societal shifts, and these oversights can lead to incorrect conclusions on the merits of intensive and organic agriculture. This is according to a trio of researchers writing in the journalNature Sustainability.

The most common method for assessing the environmental impacts ofagricultureand food is the life cycle assessment (LCA). Studies using this method sometimes claim that organic agriculture is actually worse for the climate because it has lower yields, and therefore uses more land to compensate. For example,a recent study inNature Communicationsthat made this claimwas widely reported by many publications.

However, three researchers from France, Denmark and…

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Access to water and improved water use efficiency are essential to reduce the vulnerability of rural communities to climate shocks in West Africa

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Water scarcity is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and drylands are the most affected, including West Africa.

By News Ghana – Nov 4, 2019
https://www.newsghana.com.gh/access-to-water-and-improved-water-use-efficiency-are-essential-to-reduce-the-vulnerability-of-rural-communities-to-climate-shocks-in-west-africa/

Dirty Water

West Africa and the Sahel region is among the most vulnerable to food and nutrition insecurity in Sub Saharan Africa. In West Africa, the number of undernourished people reached 51.6 million in 2018, while the prevalence of severe food insecurity in the total population reached 17.6% (SOFI 2019)

The region is characterized by harsh climatic conditions with strong climatic variations and irregular rainfalls, which are a serious obstacle to food security and poverty reduction in the region. The high variable rainfall patterns (with an average of 100 to 600 mm a year) is one among the many complex and interconnected challenges that face the region.

The majority of farmers rely on unreliable and erratic rainfall and rain fed agriculture…

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Levels and trends in child malnutrition

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Source: UNICEF, WHO, World Bank Group joint malnutrition estimates, 2019 edition. Note: *Eastern Asia excluding Japan; **Oceania excluding Australia and New Zealand;
***Northern America sub-regional average based on United States data. There is no estimate available for the sub-regions of Europe or Australia and New Zealand due to
insufficient population coverage. These maps are stylized and not to scale and do not reflect a position by UNICEF, WHO or World Bank Group on the legal status of any country
or territory or the delimitation of any frontiers.

https://www.who.int/nutgrowthdb/jme-2019-key-findings.pdf?ua=1

UNICEF / WHO / World Bank Group
Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates
Key findings of the 2019 edition

These new estimates supersede former
analyses and results published by UNICEF,
WHO and the World Bank Group.

Good nutrition allows children to survive, grow, develop,
learn, play, participate and contribute – while malnutrition
robs children of their futures and leaves young lives hanging
in the…

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The three main forms of malnutrition: under-nutrition, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and overweight and obesity (IRIN News)

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Read at :

http://www.irinnews.org/report.aspx?reportid=93469

HEALTH: WHO malnutrition initiative

GENEVA, 10 August 2011 (IRIN) – The World Health Organization has launched a web-based information system it hopes will help prevent millions of people from suffering various forms of malnutrition, ranging from under-nutrition to obesity, every year.

One of the major challenges in fighting malnutrition has been the vast and often conflicting array of evidence and advice on nutrition information. The e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA) eliminates the inconsistent standards and provides authoritative guidelines to tackle malnutrition, said Francesco Branca, WHO’s nutrition director.

“What we need to do is to make clear what are effective interventions,” Branca told journalists in Geneva ahead of the 10 August launch of the e-library at an Asian meeting on nutrition in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

eLENA covers the three main forms of malnutrition: under-nutrition, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and overweight and obesity.

(continued)

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Combating all forms of malnutrition (UN News)

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UN LAUNCHES WEB-BASED GUIDE TO HELP COMBAT ALL FORMS OF MALNUTRITION

New York, Aug 10 2011  9:05AM

The United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) today launched a web-based tool that gives governments and health-care providers access to clear guidance on how to scale up life-saving nutrition interventions to combat all forms of malnutrition.

The WHO e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA), launched at the beginning of a three-day Asian regional meeting on nutrition in Colombo, Sri Lanka, is designed to help governments overcome one of the major challenges in fighting malnutrition – the vast, and often conflicting, array of evidence and advice that exists on effective, preventive and therapeutic nutrition interventions.

The online eLENA project will prioritize and present the latest advice on tackling the three main forms of malnutrition – undernutrition, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and overweight and obesity.

“Several billion people are affected by one or more…

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Malnutrition: Tackling a major killer of under – 5s

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Newtelegraph
  – ALI GARBA Alihttps://www.newtelegraphng.com/malnutrition-tackling-a-major-killer-of-under-5s/

Every year, about 20 million children under five years of age suffer severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and of these, about one million die annually in Africa. In this report, ALI GARBA Ali highlights the ordeal of malnourished children and the intervention of the state government and other agencies to curb unnecessary mortality.

Wabu is a village in Gamawa Local Government Area of Bauchi State that has been ravaged in recent years by desertification, resulting in poor agricultural output by farmers, especially in crops and animal production needed for the growth of infants.

Moreover, due to the effects of desertification and drought, most residents in Wabu community lack access to arable farm lands that could boost the supply of food containing vital nutrients such as vegetables, fruits, beans, eggs, amongothers, for the body system, especially for the growthand development of children.

However, one-year-old Hassan…

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BOOK OUTLINES HOW AGRICULTURE CAN BE REVOLUTIONIZED, SUPPORTED BY NEW INTERNATIONAL BODIES

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Contact

Mike Krings
KU News Service -Mon, 03/16/2020 – http://today.ku.edu/2020/03/04/book-outlines-how-agriculture-can-be-revolutionized-supported-new-international-bodies

LAWRENCE —Revolutionizing the way humans practice agriculture by implementing new practices supported by international bodies might sound like a radical idea. Yet it’s possible, according to a University of Kansas legal expert whose new book shares how similar international bodies have already moved beyond the 16thcentury idea of sovereignty. A global corporate trust for agroecological integrity could help prevent a collapse in the systems humans use for food production.

Climate change, soil degradation, erosion and poor farming practices have put agriculture and ecosystems around the world in peril. John Head, the Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professor of Law at KU, has written a new book and a pair of law review articles outlining how institutional changes could form entities that oversee agricultural concerns in what he calls “eco-states” instead of nation-states. Those could usher in a change from…

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Shrinking Lake Chad could trigger humanitarian disaster (AfricaFiles / UN)

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Read at : AfricaFiles

http://www.africafiles.org/article.asp?ID=22082

Lake Chad shrinking, could disappear

Author: UN NewsDate Written: 15 October 2009
Primary Category: Ecology Document Origin: UN News Centre
Secondary Category: Central Region Source URL:http://www.un.org
Key Words: Chad, Cameroon, Lake Chad,

African Charter Article #24: All peoples shall have the right to a general satisfactory environment favorable to their development. (Click for full text…)

African Charter Article #24

All peoples shall have the right to a general satisfactory environment favorable to their development.

(Click to hide charter text)


Summary & Comment: Lake Chad, once one of the world’s largest water bodies, could disappear in 20 years due to climate change and population pressures, resulting in a humanitarian disaster in central Africa, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization warns. The lake, surrounded by Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria, has shrunk by 90 per cent, going from 25,000 square kilometers in 1963…

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‘Qatar taking steps to ensure food security’

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https://m.gulf-times.com/story/655801/Qatar-taking-steps-to-ensure-food-security

QNA/ RomeThursday، 13 February 2020 01:30 AM

Qatar is participating in the meetings of the 43rd session of the annual Governing Council of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), held under the theme “Investing in sustainable food systems to end hunger by 2030”, at the headquarters of the Council in Rome.
Qatar’s ambassador to Italy and IFAD’s Governor Abdulaziz bin Ahmed al-Maliki is heading Qatar’s delegation to the meetings which are on till February 14.
Delivering a speech at the opening session of the council’s meetings, al-Maliki stressed that Qatar has established specialised companies for food, livestock and fish production and has presented numerous agricultural investment projects to private sector investors, in addition to a number of other strategic projects for the production of vegetables using greenhouses, new projects for the production of fodder, and fish farming projects in floating cages.
The ambassador underlined that Qatar is taking…

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13 new books and reports about the future of food

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By Michael Svoboda
Tuesday, November 26, 2019
https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2019/11/13-new-books-and-reports-about-the-future-of-food/

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A New Approach to Building a Food Secure Future: Summary of Findings from the IPCC Report on Land

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REPORT by Emily Weeks
from Government of the United States of AmericaPublished on 03 Jan 2020
https://reliefweb.int/report/world/new-approach-building-food-secure-future-summary-findings-ipcc-report-land

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently released its newReport on Climate Change and LandandSummary for Policy Makers. Prepared by over 100 scientists from over 52 countries, this is the first-ever comprehensive scientific assessment of the links between land and climate change and is a critical contribution to efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, tackle the impacts of global warming and protect food security.

The report has generated significantmediaattention with particular mentions of the potential for a food crisis as climate change continues to put dire pressures on the world’s land and water resources thus jeopardizing the “ability of humanity to feed itself”. It underlines that agriculture, forestry and other types of land use account for 23 percent of greenhouse gas emissions caused directly or…

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Climate Change A Challenge To Food Security

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Kenya News Agency
KNA 
https://www.kenyanews.go.ke/climate-change-a-challenge-to-food-security/
By  Joseph  Kamolo

A climate outlook forum is underway in Mombasa to raise awareness about the use of climate services and to collectively address climate change adaptation and disaster risk management, in order to improve livelihoods and build resilience.

The 54th Great Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forum (GHACOF) meeting involving national experts and senior policy officials representing governments, regional organizations, the private sector, development partners and international agencies declared climate change and food insecurity as two interlinked problems that are contributing to underdevelopment of the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD) region.

Speaking on Monday during the official opening of the week-long meeting, the IGAD Executive Secretary (ES), Workneh Gebeyehu said about 10 per cent of the region’s 250 million people are chronically food insecure while over 80 per cent of the population derives their livelihood from agriculture and therefore factors that affect land productivity directly impact…

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How Climate Change contributes to insecurity in Nigeria, other African countries

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Premium Times
February 18, 2020https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/top-news/377470-how-climate-change-contributes-to-insecurity-in-nigeria-other-african-countries.html

Cape Town — In this allAfrica explainer we delve into the relationship between climate change and conflict on the continent

Levels of poverty, economic opportunities, and unemployment are key factors increasing the likelihood of conflict, and there is strong agreement that climate change is a majordriver of violent conflict, according to the Institute for Security Studies. Climate affects the risk of violence within countries, and as global temperatures climb, the risk of armed conflict is expected to increase substantially,reportsIPS.

But some of the biggest uncertainties are about how and why. Whether it’s because climate change may cause economic shocks in the aftermath of a disaster or leads to failure of agriculture productivity, it all comes down to three things: civil war is a lot more likely when the economy takes a downturn; the economy is more likely to take a downturn…

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Nigeria, Niger, Chad move to rehabilitate Lake Chad basin

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Logo
Published September 15, 2019
https://punchng.com/nigeria-niger-chad-move-to-rehabilitate-lake-chad-basin/

Nigeria, Niger and Chad are working on a joint trans-border agroecosystem project aimed at the restoration of livelihoods and rehabilitation of the Lake Chad Basin.

Director-General, National Agency for the Great Green Wall, Dr Bukar Hassan, disclosed this tothe News Agency of Nigeria after an international conference on desertification on Sunday in New Delhi, India.

NAN reports that the 14th Conference of Parties (CoP 14) to UN Convention to Combat Desertification was held at India Expo Centre and Mart from Sept. 2 to Sept. 13.

He said that since environmental issues did not recognize national boundaries, the partnership would help to rehabilitate agricultural system, restore degraded land and livelihoods of people in Lake Chad basin.

According to him, the project includes promotion of agroforestry and livestock development in the three participating countries bordering the Lake Chad Basin.

The Director General said that…

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UN reports rising numbers of hungry people worldwide

ILRI Clippings

Somali woman, Jul 2011 (via Flickr/IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation).

821 million people—one in nine people—are now hungry and over 150 million children are stunted, putting the ‘Zero Hunger’ SDG #2 at risk.

‘New evidence continues to signal that the number of hungry people in the world is growing, reaching 821 million in 2017 or one in every nine people, according to The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018 released today. Limited progress is also being made in addressing the multiple forms of malnutrition, ranging from child stunting to adult obesity, putting the health of hundreds of millions of people at risk.

Hunger has been on the rise over the past three years, returning to levels from a decade ago.

This reversal in progress sends a clear warning that more must be done and urgently if the Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger is to be achieved…

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Addressing Africa’s deteriorating food security should be Africa’s top priority—World Bank

ILRI Clippings

‘A key priority for Africa over the next decade should be to address a deteriorating food security situation that is compounded by the effects of climate change, declining agricultural productivity, and rapid population and urbanization growth.

Despite several commitments, ‘progress has been modest with only 9 out of 55 African countries currently on track to reduce under-nutrition to 5 percent or less by 2025. . . .

Going forward, policy priorities centered around leveraging science and digital technology and addressing fragility hold the greatest promise.

‘Climate change is already affecting agricultural production in Africa, and future projections suggest even worse outcomes. The frequency of droughts has dramatically increased, from an average of once every 12.5 years over 1982–2006 to once every 2.5 years over 2007–2016. These droughts have also become more severe and prolonged, diminishing the productive capacity of the land. Farmers face other climate risks, including lower and erratic…

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This is ‘Livestock Month’ on Agrilinks: USAID’s Andrew Bisson on sustainable livestock for sustainable development

ILRI Clippings

‘A warm welcome to the Agrilinks Livestock month! Over the course of November, we will highlight some of the roles the livestock sector plays in transforming livelihoods.

Livestock provide brain-food for an expanding global population;
economically support over half a billion poor people . . .
dependent on livestock for their livelihoods;
and provide financial, risk management and environmental services.

‘Our journey will take us to several developing countries to learn of progress and innovation. . . .

‘This month we will hear from the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock, a multi-stakeholder platform which is spearheading sustainable livestock sector development through its cluster groups and action networks. We will gain insights from friends and colleagues in our wonderful implementer community, who engage…

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On why the EAT-Lancet’s ‘Great Food Transformation’ will require a ‘Great Economic Transformation’—and more

ILRI Clippings

Illustration by Hiroko Yoshimoto.

A new paper by scientists at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and Tufts University analyses the costs of adopting the ‘universal reference diet’ recommended for both human and planetary health by the EAT-Lancet Commission (Willett et al.,Food in the Anthropocene: The EAT–Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems, 16 Jan 2019). Such a diet, report the paper’s authors, is beyond the means—indeed, it exceeds the total household per capita incomes—of more than one and a half billion people today.

Commenting on the paper, veterinary epidemiologist Delia Grace Randolph, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), says:

‘These findings make a strong case for significantly increasing the availability and accessibility of livestock products, which will require “sustainable intensification”, which means better access to livestock markets and inputs and better livestock feeds, genetics, health services and husbandry.

‘The good news…

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Inalienable imperative—More, and more sustainable, meat, milk, eggs and fish for more than one billion people

ILRI Clippings

A new scientific article from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems judiciously pushes back against some of the on-going anti-livestock rhetoric appearing in Western media.

The new paper has four big messages:

  • Meat, offal, milk, eggs and fish are vital to—and missing from—the diets of nearly 800 million people.
  • ‘Animal-sourced foods’ are the best sources of high-quality nutrient-rich food for toddlers 6–23-months old.
  • The harms caused by livestock and animal-sourced foods to human and planetary health are overstated.
  • Sustainable development must address the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable people in the world.

The Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems is a joint initiative of the University of Florida and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). Based at the University of Florida, it is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF

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Strengthening the resilience of small-scale farmers is critical to reversing the rise in hunger and ending poverty

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SHRINKING LAKE CHAD COULD TRIGGER HUMANITARIAN DISASTER (UNNews)

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Read at : UNNews

SHRINKING LAKE CHAD COULD TRIGGER HUMANITARIAN DISASTER, UN AGENCY WARNS

New York, Oct 15 2009 11:05AM

Lake Chad, once one of the world’s largest water bodies, could disappear in 20 years due to climate change and population pressures, resulting in a humanitarian disaster in central Africa, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (<“http://www.fao.org/”>FAO) warned today.

The lake – surrounded by Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria – has shrunk by 90 per cent, going from 25,000 square kilometers in 1963 to less than 1,500 square kilometers in 2001.

The 30 million people living in the Lake Chad region are being forced into competing over water, and the drying up of the lake could lead to migration and conflicts, FAO cautioned.

Fish production has recorded a 60 per cent decline, while pasturelands have been degraded, resulting in a shortage of animal feed, livestock and biodiversity.

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Crisis affecting the Lake Chad basin countries, including Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria.

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Photo credit: UN NEWS CENTRE

Attacks by Boko Haram and counter-insurgency measures in the Lake Chad Basin have displaced more than 2.5 million people in four countries. Credit: OCHA/Ivo Brandau

Seven million people in Lake Chad basin ‘living on the edge’ – UN relief official

Spotlighting the desperate plight of millions in Africa’s Lake Chad basin, the top United Nations humanitarian official for the Sahel region called today for international solidarity with the people in urgent need.

“I wish I had good news, but I don’t,” Toby Lanzer, the Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sahel, told a news conference at the UN Headquarters, in New York that was largely focused on the crisis affecting Lake Chad basin countries, which include Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria.

“11 million people are in desperate need of humanitarian aid, 7.1 million of them are severely food insecure. [They are] living on the edge – surviving…

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Nigeria seeks more international support to tackle humanitarian crisis in Lake Chad Region

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10 Septembre 
http://www.faapa.info/nigeria-seeks-more-international-support-to-tackle-humanitarian-crisis-in-lake-chad-region/

Abuja (India), Sept. 10, 2019 (NAN) Nigeria has again appealed for more international support to confront the humanitarian disasters arising from drought, land degradation and desertification in the Lake Chad Basin Region.

The Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Environment, Ibukun Odusote, made the appeal on Tuesday in her presentation at the high level segment of the 14th Session of Conference of Parties (COP 14) to the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) underway in New Delhi, India.

Odusote, who led the Nigerian delegation to COP 14, told the international audience that the humanitarian crisis in the Lake Chad Basin region was one of the world’s largest and most complex humanitarian disasters.

“In the drylands of Nigeria, the livelihoods of over 40 million people are threatened by land degradation and desertification, thus raising the spectre of food insecurity and spurring deadly conflicts between farmers and herders over…

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Researchers call for a gendered approach in strategies for community uptake of livestock vaccines

AgHealth

The design of strategies for uptake of livestock vaccines by communities in East Africa should take into account that male and female farmers face different barriers in the uptake of the vaccines, a new research study says.

These barriers include the cost of the vaccines, distances to vaccination points, access to information on vaccination campaigns and decision-making processes at household level. Some constraints affect both men and women while others affect one gender group only, based on prevailing gender norms and division of labour.

The study, published in the journal Vaccines (8 Aug 2019), was undertaken by a team of scientists from the International Livestock Research Institute, Uganda’s Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries and the United States Agency for International Development Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance.

The work was carried out in purposively selected sites, namely, Kwale and Murang’a counties in Kenya and Arua and Ibanda districts…

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In Burundi, What Do Farmers and Food Waste Have in Common?

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World Food Program USA
July 30, 2019
https://www.wfpusa.org/stories/farmersandfoodwasteinburundi/?fbclid=IwAR1CtJg8uPL7N10FtMRdh1fR0XHw5hs4qxslB_NgPQboLW6KsAmz9T3uYoo

Burundi, February 2009

Sustainable Land Management project in Kayanza, in north Burundi. The project was implemented in 2007 through food-for-work. Nowadays WFP provides only technical assistance to the farmers. The terraced are is approximately 2.5 Ha. WFP and the church worked together to get the land for the community to farm. It was previously very badly degraded. They have planted ~145,000 trees to help with soil stability, some of which are for commercial use such as eucalyptus. They received 72 metric tons of food from WFP plus technical expertise for the project. The association owns the land, there are 115 people participating in it including 45 women (women aren’t allowed to own land according to Burundian law).

Photo: WFP/Laura Melo

In Burundi, 90 percent of the population is dependent on agriculture, but agricultural productivity and access to farmable land are low.

If all the food produced…

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Desertification in Nigeria (African Agriculture)

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 Read at :

 http://africanagriculture.blogspot.com/search/label/desertification

Friday, March 9, 2007

Farmers in northern Nigeria suffer the effects of desertification

“A powerful article by Lanre Oyetade on the human causes and effects of desertification, featured in The Tribune :

In the late 1990s, Alhaji A hmad Idi could count on his land to produce 40 big sacks of sorghum and another 20 full of groundnuts each year. But today, he works twice as hard to squeeze out yields half that size. “There isn’t enough rain and we have to dig deeper and deeper to find water,” said Idi, a farmer in the Makoda region, two hours from Nigeria’s northern border with Niger.

And yet, to look at his land, nothing seems to have changed, he says: a few trees and shrubs, some soil – same as ever. “The effects of desertification are felt long before sand dunes start appearing,” explained Abdul-Azeez Abba, a…

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Nigeria’s grazing crisis threatens the future of the nation

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Financial Times

LAILA JOHNSON-SALAMI

https://www.ft.com/content/a56ccf22-a331-11e9-a282-2df48f366f7d

Ethnic Fulani herdsmen have moved their cattle to Nigeria’s middle belt region because of population growth and desertification in the north © AFP

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https://www.ft.com/content/a56ccf22-a331-11e9-a282-2df48f366f7d

Nigeria’s cattle-grazing crisis has become a national security threat, sparking ethnic tension nationwide. Amnesty International estimates that more than 2,000 deaths in 2018 alone resulted from clashes between herdsmen and farmers over access to water and pasture and the destruction of land and property — particularly belonging to farmers in the country’s middle belt region. Herdsmen from the Fulani…

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PTF: The Forgotten #Livestock Dream by @AliyuTilde1

The Ruga controversy reminded me of Pastoral Development Project (PDP, incidentally) of the defunct Petroleum (Special) Trust Fund (PTF). Between 1996 and 1997 the PTF conceived the idea of rehabilitating our grazing reserves and livestock routes. It employed consultants to do the survey of the existing routes and bills were prepared for the execution of the contracts.

Below are, for example, the stock routes billed for rehabilitation.

___________________________
PRIORITISED STOCK ROUTES FOR REHABILITATION

Wase – Makurdi 210.2km
Potiskum – Bauchi 220.2km
Bauchi – Lere 110.0km
Lere – Wase 100.4km
Bauchi – Bukuru 130.7km
Bukuru – Wamba 110.2km
Wamba – Lafia 50.4km
Lafia – Makurdi 90.2km
Makurdi – Otukpo 70.0km
Otukpo – Nsukka 100.6km
Nsukka – Adani 40.5km
Adani – Onitsha 70.6km
Nsukka – Enugu 50.4km
Enugu – Okigwe 70.2km

Birnin Konni – Sokoto 80.2km
Dioundiou – Birnin Kebbi 50.8km
Sokoto – Yelwa 310.1km
Yelwa – New Bussa 150.0km
Bangui – Bena 310.1km
Bena – Kontagora 120.3km
Kontagora – New Bussa 140.4km
New Bussa – Kaiama 70.4km
Kaiama – Iseyin 210.0km
Iseyin – Oyo 40.2km
Oyo – Ibadan 50.3km

Kontagora – Bokani 100.6km
Bokani – Ilorin 150.0km
Ilorin – Osogbo 90.4km
Osogbo – Ibadan 90.0km
Ibadan – Sagamu 90.5km
Sagamu – Ikorodu 30.2km

Bangui – Kaura Namoda 130.2km
Kaura Namoda Gusau 40.9km
Gusau – Birnin Gwari 180.1km
Birnin Gwari – Minna 210.0km
Minna – Abaji 130.5km

Katsina – Dutsin Ma 60.2km
Dutsin Ma – Funtua 110.9km
Funtua – Kaduna 120.4km
Kaduna – Gwada 120.8km
Gwada – Minna 30.5km

Doungas – Kano 130.5km
Kano – Zaria 130.8km
Zaria – Kaduna 90.1km
Kano – Wudil 40.8km
Wudil – Ikara 90.6km
Ikara – Zonkwa 160.4km
Zonkwa – Kagoro 20.4km
Kagoro – Keffi 100.0km
Keffi – Abaji 140.6km
Keffi – Lokoja 170.8km
Abaji – Lokoja 230.3km
Lokoja – Auchi 100.6km
Auchi – Benin City 110.3km
Benin – Warri 90.3km

Ibadan – Ife 80.9km
Ife – Ilesha 20.8km
Ilesha – Ikole 120.4km
Ikole – Akure 110.4km
Akure – Ikare 80.2km
Ikole – Ikare 60.3km
Ikare – Auchi 120.0km

Bosso – Geidam 180.7km
Geidam – Ringim 320.8km
Ringim – Kano 70.3km
Geidam – Damaturu 180.7km
Bosso – Gubio 180.7km
Gubio – Maiduguri 90.6km
Frontier – Dikwa 70.5km
Dikwa – Maiduguri 80.6km
Maiduguri – Damaturu 130.5km
Damaturu – Potiskum 90.9km
Potiskum – Duku 100.8km
Duku – Wase 220.6km

Maiduguri – Biu 170.7km
Damaturu – Biu 130.5km
Biu – Gombe 120.4km
Gombe – Numan 130.8km
Biu – Numan 140.6km
Numan – Jalingo 100.4km
Jalingo – Nuri 90.7km
Nuri – Wase 120.0km

Frontier – Bama 80.3km
Bama – Mubi Junction 160.2km
Bama – Numa 320.7km
Jalingo – Wukari 200.5km
Wukari – Katsina-Ala 90.1km
Katsina-Ala – Otukpo 130.5km
Jalingo – Bali 120.2km
Frontier – Yola 40.3km
Yola – Bali 270.8km
Bali – Mararaba 110.6km
Mararaba – Katsina-Ala 110.9km
Bali – Ngurore 140.2km
Ngurore – Frontier 70.4km
Yola – Ganye 160.7km
Ganye – Frontier 30.3km

Katsina – Mani 40.2km
Mani – Daura 30.4km
Daura – Kazaure 60.3km
Kazaure – Danbarta 20.8km
Danbarta – Kano 60.1km
Sassoumoroun – Daura 50.6km
(Niger)

Total 12,104.80km
_____________________________________

There were components of the project for grazing reserves nationwide too. Already, PTF had supplied veterinary drugs and equipment to all states of the federation. Nigeria was one.

Then Obasanjo happened. 1999.

That was exactly 20 years ago. Buhari, the PTF Chairman left. It was hoped that in spite of the differences between the then two former heads of state and Obasanjo’s promise of scrapping the PTF, the new President as an experienced administrator will burry the hatchet, take time to sort out the various projects PTF was undertaking and arrange for various ministries to continue with the ones that would contribute to his success. What he did instead was to kill PTF and appoint the Haruna Adamu committee to bury it along with whatever good it contained.

The sad thing was that Obasanjo like all politicians in Nigeria had no blueprint to guide him on what to do. They come in empty handed, with minds filled with grudges and spend years doing little. As a result, they achieve far less than Nigerians expect. Obasanjo was not different. Agriculture received a superficial treatment, nothing beyond fertilizer distribution and loans. Livestock infrastructure was not addressed at all.

Then Buhari returned. 2015.

Like Obasanjo, he came in with good intentions and a lucid vision. He came with a dream but without the details of how to actualize it. Four years have gone and the story of livestock infrastructure is still on page one even as the country starts to pay dearly for the negligence of the past forty years. Farmers and herders are clashing over land, each encroaching into the space of the other. Farmers, miners and land grabbers are seizing forests and grazing reserves. Stock routes are blocked by farms and buildings. Animals are straying as they move or graze close to farms. Blood is spilled. Nigeria is bleeding. And President Buhari, the one time Chairman of the PTF is still on page one – the drawing board!

He is sold different programs. Ranching. Colonies. NLTP. Ruga. Etc. From the characters inventing these tales, I am beginning to believe that the President may finish his tenure achieving just as little as Obasanjo in the area of livestock development. His first Minister of Agriculture, Mr. Audu Ogbeh, has left office without a single meter of stock route repaired or a meter square of grazing reserve rehabilitated. In 2016, he promised us that in 8 months, not a single cow will be roaming in Nigeria. 36 months later, not a cow is restricted. He is clearly anti-grazing. And watch out. He may return.

Will it be a crime for Buhari to revisit his pastoral dream in PTF that will go a long way in solving the problems of grazing and livestock movement? I do not think so. What is more interesting is that he only needs to ask the project consultants to re-open their spreadsheets and, behold, everything will be there, including bill of quantities, which will only need to be updated in pricing.

And work can start of course with the expedited completion of due process. He has partners in the willing governors and their states, who are so many to give him the sufficient company he needs in his journey. This is better than an NLTP that is subject to sabortage at every stage of its implementation, embodied with many explosives and which may just be another Kano Film Village, Second Niger Bridge, Baro Port, Kano-Maradi Railway Line, Mambila Dam, Refineries, Electricity, etc.

Obasanjo could stop Buhari’s dream in 1999 and kill the PTF – and he did – but he cannot kill the dream entirely. Buhari can revisit that dream and actualize it with the opportunity that he has now as the President. That dream can be in addition to the NLTP, a fall back position, just in case the latter turns out to suffer another ill-fate of ranching, colony or Ruga. In any case, the elitist NLTP, if ever implemented over the next ten years, will cater for only a small fraction of our cattle population. His 1996 dream, which can be modernized too, is more realistic and more encompassing.

Most northerners are concerned about livestock for a reason. It is the second largest contributor to our GDP and, you can say, the major ‘foreign exchange’ earner for the region. While the south exports to the North almost every industrial product it needs, cattle and grains are the only things the North exports to the south, with cattle earning most. The southwest consumes 10,000 cattle daily – 5,000 in Lagos State alone. A similar number may be consumed daily in the southeast and south south combined.

The much villified herdsman is just the custodian of the cattle, living in sub-human conditions of the forest. The butchers and other sedentary Nigerians in the value chain – like transporters, restaurants, dairy companies, tanners, exporters, etc. – gain much more than the herdsman, the butcher alone earning between 25% and 35% of the price of a cow. He saves the governments over billion of dollars in foreign exchange annually.

Yet, the poor herdsman cannot use up to N2,000 of the price of a cow he sold. He will buy another in the market to replace it. What a good custodian! His penury and ascetic life is helping to keep the bovine population steady for Nigerians. Livestock contributes 6% of our GDP. Northerners – and indeed Nigerians – can only be foolish to let this priceless commodity go. The investment of government in livestock services, as in other sectors of the economy, cannot be overemphasized.

So let the President’s old pastoral dream start to take shape in willing states – the home states of our cattle – rehabilitating our grazing reserves with facilities like dams, vet clinics, artificial insemination services, etc. and our stock routes with beacons, resting points and wells. If the benefit becomes manifest, other states can key in.

That dream is the property of Mr. President. He should not allow anyone to destroy it.

Dr. Aliyu U. Tilde
13 July 2019

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PRESS RELEASE: @NAFDACAgency RESPONDS TO THE ABUSE AND MISUSE OF SNIPER (100 ml) PACK SIZE AND OTHER BRANDS OF AGRICULTURAL FORMULATIONS OF DICHLORVOS PRODUCTS

The National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) is gravely concerned about the recent trend in the abuse and misuse of 100ml of Sniper insecticide and other brands of Agricultural formulations of Dichlorvos to commit suicide. The other brands of the agricultural formulations of 100 ml pack size of dichlovos include: (Tankill, Gladiator Liquid, Executor Liquid, Smash Super Liquid, DD Force, Glovan, Philopest, Wonder Liquid, Rid-Off, NOPEST and SUMODDVP). These products are misused as household insecticide and direct misapplication on agricultural produce. The abuse and misuse of the 100ml of these products is associated with serious Public Health hazards such as cancer and respiratory disorder.

Sniper and other brands of Dichlorvos formulations are agricultural insecticides, registered for use as Crop Protection Product (CPP) only. The availability of this product in small retail pack sizes of 100ml and their sales in open-markets and supermarkets have made the product readily available for abuse and misuse as a household insect repellant, as an agent to control insect infestation in agricultural food and a tool for suicide in the Country.

NAFDAC Act Cap N1 LFN 2004 has mandated the Agency to regulate and control the importation, exportation, distribution, manufacture, advertisement, sales and use of drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, bottled water and chemicals, which includes Agrochemicals. In view of this, the Agency wishes to draw the attention of the general public to the regulatory measures and control put in place to arrest/mitigate this abuse and misuse of Sniper and other brands of Dichlorvos formulations meant for agricultural use as follows:

1. NAFDAC bans the importation and manufacture of 100ml pack size of Agricultural formulations of Dichlorvos with immediate effect.

2. NAFDAC bans with immediate effect hawking of all agrochemical formulations

3. NAFDAC is giving a two-month (up to 31st August 2019) notice to brand owners/distributors to withdraw their products from open markets and supermarkets that do not have garden corner/shelves to the agro dealer outlets. The sales of Sniper insecticide and other Dichlorvos brands in open markets and supermarkets nationwide are prohibited with effect from 1ST September 2019.

4. NAFDAC is giving a six-month moratorium up to 1st January 2020 for brand owners to exhaust the products that are in various accredited agro-input dealers (distributors/marketers/retailers) outlets.

5. Mandatory listing of Dealers (distributors/marketers/retailers) of agrochemicals. All NAFDAC formations are to collect the list to ensure continual monitoring of all agro dealers in their States.

6. The Agency has introduced permit to clear all bulk pesticides and agrochemicals. Importers/Manufacturers/marketers are advised to liaise with Veterinary Medicine and Allied Products Directorate or closest NAFDAC offices or visit the Agency website at https//www.nafdac.gov.ng for more information and guidance.

7. All NAFDAC formations are to commence enforcement on restriction of sales of crop protection products to NAFDAC listed and accredited agro-inputs dealers/distributors/marketers nationwide by 1ST April 2020.

8. NAFDAC advises the General Public to desist from the misuse of agricultural formulations of Dichlorvos as household insecticides, as such malpractice is associated with public health hazards.

9. The General public may wish to note that CropLife Nigeria in collaboration with NAFDAC has agreed to undertake the following: –

i. Mop-up of 100ml agrochemical formulation of Dichlorvos from open markets and supermarkets by importers, manufacturers and distributors and to be monitored by NAFDAC nationwide from 1st September 2019.

ii. intensify the continual evidence-based sensitization workshop on proper use and handling of pesticides and agrochemicals across the country.

iii. Provide antidotes against Dichlorvos poisoning in tertiary and secondary medical centers across Nigeria.

iv. The reformulation of all Dichlorvos preparation to include bitter agent and vomiting induce agent.

v. Training process of all agro dealers will commence from 1st September 2019

vi. Improved labeling, sealing and packaging to include amongst others the use of color band to differentiate World Health Organization (WHO) toxicity classification on all agrochemical and removal of pictorials of household pests from labels of agrochemicals/crop production products.

May I at this point call on all good citizens of our dear country to always adhere to all regulatory measures when handling or using NAFDAC regulated products. It is important to read carefully the label on the regulated products before using. The Agency is committed to safeguarding the health of Nigerians. The Agency seeks the cooperation of Nigerians in achieving the mandate of Safeguarding the health of the Nation.

NAFDAC…Customer-focused, Agency-minded

DG NAFDAC

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Celebrating World Zoonoses Day with a focus on ILRI’s research on zoonotic diseases

AgHealth

Taking sheep for disease testing in Bako, Ethiopia
Taking sheep for disease testing in Bako, Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Barbara Wieland).

World Zoonoses Day is
marked annually on 6 July to commemorate the day in 1885 when Louis Pasteur
successfully administered the first vaccine against a zoonotic disease when he
treated a young boy who had been mauled by a rabid dog. The day is also an opportunity
to raise awareness of the risk of zoonoses, infectious diseases that are spread
between animals and people.

Scientists estimate
that 60% of known infectious diseases in people and 75% of new or emerging
infectious diseases in people are transmitted from animals. Neglected zoonoses
associated with livestock, such as brucellosis and cysticercosis, impose a huge
health burden on poor people and reduce the value of their livestock assets.

Through its Animal and Human Health program, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) carries out research with national and international partners towards…

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CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health publishes 2018 annual report

AgHealth

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health 2018 annual report cover

The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) has published its 2018 annual report, highlighting program activities and research results from across A4NH’s five research flagships and five focus countries. These include:

  • research into consumer choices, motives and barriers through the lens of vegetable consumption in urban Nigeria;
  • building the evidence base with newly-published research that shows biofortified high-iron pearl millet can significantly improve nutrition and cognitive performance;
  • significant research contributions to help policymakers and consumers understand food safety issues and risks;
  • how agriculture and nutrition interventions delivered through community-based childcare centres can impact nutrient intake, dietary diversity and nutritional status;
  • improving hospital diagnostics for human brucellosis; and
  • an exploration of gender research projects being conducted under A4NH.

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Development policy and practice – a case study in disruptive innovations

ILRI news

By Eva Ohlsson and Boleslaw Stawicki 

A disease that was supposed to have been preventable by vaccine recently reemerged as a major killer of chicks in Kenya, seriously damaging the livelihoods of countless smallholder farmers and driving thousands of them out of the poultry business altogether. It wasn’t supposed to be this way: A vaccine for infectious bursal disease, an acute, highly contagious viral disease of young chickens, had been developed in the previous decade and raised hopes of someday eliminating the disease. Yet by the 2010s, it was becoming clear that the vaccine wasn’t nearly as effective as anticipated. In Kenya and elsewhere, whole flocks of vaccinated chicks were coming down with the disease; in some cases, mortality rates neared 100 percent.

Chickens require little in the way of space and start-up capital. Most poultry growers in Kenya are smallholder mixed livestock and crop farmers—and a majority of these…

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On a frugal continent of ‘economic vegetarians’, consuming more meat means longer, healthier lives—The Economist

ILRI Clippings

A slaughterhouse in Maputo, Mozambique (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

The Economist reports that the future of food lies in Africa. And why that’s a good thing. Read on to find out why.

As Africans get richer, they will eat more meat and live longer, healthier lives

‘. . . Between 1961 and 2013 the average Chinese person went from eating 4kg of meat a year to 62kg. Half of the world’s pork is eaten in the country. More liberal agricultural policies have allowed farms to produce more—in 1961 China was suffering under the awful experiment in collectivisation known as the “great leap forward”. But the main reason the Chinese are eating more meat is simply that they are wealthier.

In rich countries people go vegan for January and pour oat milk over their breakfast cereal. In the world as a whole, the trend is the other way.

‘In the decade…

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New report says investments in food safety in sub-Saharan Africa should prioritize the needs of local consumers

AgHealth

Locally made beef stew sold in Bagnon market at Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné).
Locally made beef stew sold in Bagnon market at Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné).

Donor investment in food safety in sub-Saharan Africa should have greater focus on the needs of consumers in Africa, according to a new report by the Global Food Safety Partnership.

The report, Food safety in Africa: Past endeavors and future directions, analysed donor investment in over 500 food safety projects undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa since 2010. It found that more than half of these projects were focused on overseas markets and less than half on consumers in sub-Saharan Africa, most of whom rely on informal food markets and bear the greatest health burden of unsafe food.

According to estimates from the World Health Organization, foodborne disease in Africa results in 137,000 deaths and 91 million cases of illness a year. Globally, foodborne disease has a public health burden similar to…

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New case study presents nine-year follow-up of pilot project to improve food safety in Bodija market, Nigeria

AgHealth

Goat in a market in Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).
Goat in a market in Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

Foodborne disease is a major public health problem in poor countries, but we lack effective, sustainable and scalable approaches that work in the traditional, informal markets where most fresh, risky food is sold.

A promising intervention is working with informal sector vendors to provide training and technologies, an enabling environment, and motivation for behaviour change.

A case study published in the March 2019 issue of the journal Infection Ecology & Epidemiology presents a long-term follow-up of a pilot project to improve food safety in Bodija abattoir and meat market, one of the largest markets in Nigeria.

An evaluation shortly after implementation found the intervention was acceptable, cost-effective and resulted in safer meat. The follow-up nine years later used qualitative surveys and microbiological tests.

The policy environment had become disabling, partly because of attempts by the authorities to move butchers to…

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Tanzania launches USD596 million livestock master plan

ILRI news

Tanzania livestock master plan launchTanzania minister for livestock and fisheries, Luhaga Mpina (right), receives a copy of the Tanzania livestock master plan from Barry Shapiro, senior livestock development advisor at ILRI (photo credit: Eveline Massam/IITA).

Tanzania’s livestock sector is set for a major boost following the official launch of a TZS1.4 trillion (USD596 million) Tanzania livestock master plan (TLMP). The TLMP is a five-year plan geared towards addressing major challenges facing the sector and transforming it by guiding investments in major subsectors. To realize the TLMP, at the request of the Government of Tanzania, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) provided technical assistance and training to the Tanzania Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries in a project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

A livestock master plan is a vision-driven, evidence-based road map with investment plans that seeks to improve animal productivity and production, as well as increase the value addition of key…

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WHY ARE PEOPLE AFRAID OF INTRODUCING NEW VEGETABLES AND FRUIT TREES ?

DESERTIFICATION

Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University (Belgium)

Since August 2007, the time that I launched our action ‘SEEDS FOR FOOD’, a number of people came up with questions about the danger of introducing new vegetables and fruits in developing countries, where they can easily be grown in containers.

I have already replied to these ‘interrogations’ in a couple of messages:

(1) Invasive vegetables?  Could they create problems? (Adam STUART / Patrick HARRY / Willem VAN COTTHEM)

Permalink:http://desertification.wordpress.com/2009/11/27/invasive-veget…em-van-cotthem/

(2) A convenient truth for combating hunger and desertification (Willem Van Cotthem)

Permalink:http://desertification.wordpress.com/2009/11/01/a-convenient-t…em-van-cotthem/

Today, I like to bring to your special attention an article published by African Agriculture: http://www.africanagricultureblog.com/2010/07/us-farmers-find-opportunity-in.html

Title: US farmers find opportunity in vegetables newly introduced by immigrants

Let me highlight some paragraphs:

    • Maxixe, a Brazilian relative of the cucumber, is relatively unknown in the U.S., but it may one day be as common as cilantro as farmers…

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Overuse and misuse of antibiotics – a problem driven by the world’s poor and rich alike

ILRI Clippings

Kibera alley way Kibera slum alley (photo via Flickr/Ninara)

As reported this week by Andrew Jacobs and Matt Richtel in the New York Times, ‘Kibera residents are prodigious consumers of antibiotics’.

Kibera area, one of Africa’s largest urban slums, is located in Nairobi, Kenya, with a population of around one million. Most people in the sl

um lack access to running water, electricity and medical care. Diseases caused by poor hygiene are prevalent.

Antibiotic resistance isn’t just a rich-country problem; it’s a global threat to us all. And the overuse and misuse of antibiotics that is helping to fuel resistance to antibiotic treatments is also not just a rich-country problem.

Consider Sharon Mbone, the Kibera resident described in the New York Times article. With no money to see a doctor to help her 22-month-old son recover from a fever, diarrhea and vomiting, she did what most mothers would do in her circumstance—she…

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Why livestock matter – share your project change story

ILRI news

People in developing countries know that livestock are critical for sustainable development. The world’s cows, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry and other farm animals are the mainstay of livelihoods across the developing world. And the energy and nutrient-dense milk, meat and eggs these animals produce provide peopl with basic livelihoods, incomes, food and nutrition.

Yet, it is difficult to successfully make the case for greater investment in sustainable livestock. People worry that livestock are bad for our health and environment. Investors say they don’t see enough convincing evidence and data that demonstrates the returns livestock interventions offer. Hard evidence is scattered and recommendations are complex due to the multiple roles livestock play in development.

The whylivestockmatter web site brings together evidence showing why increased and improved investments in sustainable livestock development are necessary. As we compiled this evidence, we observed that  many rich experiences and lessons from practice are not captured…

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