CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health publishes 2018 annual report

AgHealth

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health 2018 annual report cover

The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) has published its 2018 annual report, highlighting program activities and research results from across A4NH’s five research flagships and five focus countries. These include:

  • research into consumer choices, motives and barriers through the lens of vegetable consumption in urban Nigeria;
  • building the evidence base with newly-published research that shows biofortified high-iron pearl millet can significantly improve nutrition and cognitive performance;
  • significant research contributions to help policymakers and consumers understand food safety issues and risks;
  • how agriculture and nutrition interventions delivered through community-based childcare centres can impact nutrient intake, dietary diversity and nutritional status;
  • improving hospital diagnostics for human brucellosis; and
  • an exploration of gender research projects being conducted under A4NH.

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Development policy and practice – a case study in disruptive innovations

ILRI news

By Eva Ohlsson and Boleslaw Stawicki 

A disease that was supposed to have been preventable by vaccine recently reemerged as a major killer of chicks in Kenya, seriously damaging the livelihoods of countless smallholder farmers and driving thousands of them out of the poultry business altogether. It wasn’t supposed to be this way: A vaccine for infectious bursal disease, an acute, highly contagious viral disease of young chickens, had been developed in the previous decade and raised hopes of someday eliminating the disease. Yet by the 2010s, it was becoming clear that the vaccine wasn’t nearly as effective as anticipated. In Kenya and elsewhere, whole flocks of vaccinated chicks were coming down with the disease; in some cases, mortality rates neared 100 percent.

Chickens require little in the way of space and start-up capital. Most poultry growers in Kenya are smallholder mixed livestock and crop farmers—and a majority of these…

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On a frugal continent of ‘economic vegetarians’, consuming more meat means longer, healthier lives—The Economist

ILRI Clippings

A slaughterhouse in Maputo, Mozambique (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

The Economist reports that the future of food lies in Africa. And why that’s a good thing. Read on to find out why.

As Africans get richer, they will eat more meat and live longer, healthier lives

‘. . . Between 1961 and 2013 the average Chinese person went from eating 4kg of meat a year to 62kg. Half of the world’s pork is eaten in the country. More liberal agricultural policies have allowed farms to produce more—in 1961 China was suffering under the awful experiment in collectivisation known as the “great leap forward”. But the main reason the Chinese are eating more meat is simply that they are wealthier.

In rich countries people go vegan for January and pour oat milk over their breakfast cereal. In the world as a whole, the trend is the other way.

‘In the decade…

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New report says investments in food safety in sub-Saharan Africa should prioritize the needs of local consumers

AgHealth

Locally made beef stew sold in Bagnon market at Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné).
Locally made beef stew sold in Bagnon market at Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné).

Donor investment in food safety in sub-Saharan Africa should have greater focus on the needs of consumers in Africa, according to a new report by the Global Food Safety Partnership.

The report, Food safety in Africa: Past endeavors and future directions, analysed donor investment in over 500 food safety projects undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa since 2010. It found that more than half of these projects were focused on overseas markets and less than half on consumers in sub-Saharan Africa, most of whom rely on informal food markets and bear the greatest health burden of unsafe food.

According to estimates from the World Health Organization, foodborne disease in Africa results in 137,000 deaths and 91 million cases of illness a year. Globally, foodborne disease has a public health burden similar to…

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New case study presents nine-year follow-up of pilot project to improve food safety in Bodija market, Nigeria

AgHealth

Goat in a market in Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).
Goat in a market in Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

Foodborne disease is a major public health problem in poor countries, but we lack effective, sustainable and scalable approaches that work in the traditional, informal markets where most fresh, risky food is sold.

A promising intervention is working with informal sector vendors to provide training and technologies, an enabling environment, and motivation for behaviour change.

A case study published in the March 2019 issue of the journal Infection Ecology & Epidemiology presents a long-term follow-up of a pilot project to improve food safety in Bodija abattoir and meat market, one of the largest markets in Nigeria.

An evaluation shortly after implementation found the intervention was acceptable, cost-effective and resulted in safer meat. The follow-up nine years later used qualitative surveys and microbiological tests.

The policy environment had become disabling, partly because of attempts by the authorities to move butchers to…

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Tanzania launches USD596 million livestock master plan

ILRI news

Tanzania livestock master plan launchTanzania minister for livestock and fisheries, Luhaga Mpina (right), receives a copy of the Tanzania livestock master plan from Barry Shapiro, senior livestock development advisor at ILRI (photo credit: Eveline Massam/IITA).

Tanzania’s livestock sector is set for a major boost following the official launch of a TZS1.4 trillion (USD596 million) Tanzania livestock master plan (TLMP). The TLMP is a five-year plan geared towards addressing major challenges facing the sector and transforming it by guiding investments in major subsectors. To realize the TLMP, at the request of the Government of Tanzania, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) provided technical assistance and training to the Tanzania Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries in a project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

A livestock master plan is a vision-driven, evidence-based road map with investment plans that seeks to improve animal productivity and production, as well as increase the value addition of key…

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WHY ARE PEOPLE AFRAID OF INTRODUCING NEW VEGETABLES AND FRUIT TREES ?

DESERTIFICATION

Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM

Ghent University (Belgium)

Since August 2007, the time that I launched our action ‘SEEDS FOR FOOD’, a number of people came up with questions about the danger of introducing new vegetables and fruits in developing countries, where they can easily be grown in containers.

I have already replied to these ‘interrogations’ in a couple of messages:

(1) Invasive vegetables?  Could they create problems? (Adam STUART / Patrick HARRY / Willem VAN COTTHEM)

Permalink:http://desertification.wordpress.com/2009/11/27/invasive-veget…em-van-cotthem/

(2) A convenient truth for combating hunger and desertification (Willem Van Cotthem)

Permalink:http://desertification.wordpress.com/2009/11/01/a-convenient-t…em-van-cotthem/

Today, I like to bring to your special attention an article published by African Agriculture: http://www.africanagricultureblog.com/2010/07/us-farmers-find-opportunity-in.html

Title: US farmers find opportunity in vegetables newly introduced by immigrants

Let me highlight some paragraphs:

    • Maxixe, a Brazilian relative of the cucumber, is relatively unknown in the U.S., but it may one day be as common as cilantro as farmers…

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