If Africa learnt to feed its chickens, it could feed its people—Calestous Juma

ILRI Clippings

Empowering women through poultry

Farmer from southern Ethiopia’s Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’ region holding one of her household chickens (photo credit: ILRI Camille Hanotte).

Written by Calestous Juma, Harvard University.

Africa, which imports nearly 83% of the food it consumes, has a real chicken and egg problem. The continent is caught between pressure from imports in some countries and an inability to meet demand in others.

Africa’s chicken crisis is an expression of overall weaknesses in its agricultural system. If Africa cannot raise its grain production it cannot expect do well in increasing its chicken output.

It is a complex problem. Producing chickens requires low-cost feed such as corn. Yet producing grain to meet human needs remains one of the continent’s most pressing challenges. Africa’s urban populations, for example, are growing faster than the continent can produce grain. This has contributed to Africa’s shift from being a net food exporter to…

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About Dr. B. A. USMAN

I started as a field Veterinary officer with the Borno State Ministry of Agriculture and later joined College of Agric, maiduguri as a lecture & a researcher in the Department of Animal Health & Production. I was appointed the Provost of the College In 2003. 2007 I was appointed Hon. Commissioner & Member Borno State Executive Council and later appointed Permanent Secretary with the Borno State Civil Service in 2009. I was the National Facilitator Animal Health, National Programme For Food Security of the Federal Ministry of Agric & Rural Development, Abuja. I'm currently the Director, Veterinary Medicine & Allied Products (VMAP) NAFDAC, Nigeria. I engaged myself in various aspects of the veterinary profession. I'm a practicing Veterinarian & Strong Advocate of #SDGs most especially #SDGs 1, 2, 4 & 5 I founded Sril Group Ltd.
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