Author Archives: Dr. Bukar USMAN, mni

About Dr. Bukar USMAN, mni

I started as a field Veterinary officer with the Borno State Ministry of Agriculture and later joined College of Agric, maiduguri as a lecture & a researcher in the Department of Animal Health & Production. I was appointed the Provost of the College In 2003. In 2007 I was appointed Hon. Commissioner & Member Borno State Executive Council and later appointed Permanent Secretary with the Borno State Civil Service in 2009. I was the National Facilitator Animal Health, National Programme For Food Security of the Federal Ministry of Agric & Rural Development, Abuja. I am now the Director, Veterinary Medicine & Allied Products (VMAP) NAFDAC. I’m a ‘member of the National Institute’ (mni), Kuru SEC 40, 2018. I engaged myself in various aspects of the veterinary profession. I founded Sril Group Ltd, Nigeria.

Call for papers: Analytical Approaches to Post-Exceptionalism in Food and Agricultural Governance

Originally posted on Food Governance:
Join us at the 2019 General Conference of the European Consortium for Political Research in Wrocław, Poland.  Due to the sensitive nature of the associated public goods (food safety, health, environmental concerns), policy makers have…

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Livestock and agroecology — Small Scaled Farmers and the pastoralists are the backbones of animal agriculture. They play a pivotal role not only in producing quality food item but also conserving the genetic resources as well as nature for the next generations. Contrast to the factory farming small scaled farming and pastoralism do not use (up to their level best) pesticides and chemical fertilizers etc. They do not harm nature by the blind use of inputs like energy and water. They are the custodians of the genes and nature.

Originally posted on Small Scaled Farmers and the pastoralists are the backbones of animal agriculture. They play a pivotal role not only in producing quality food item but also conserving the genetic resources as well as nature for the next generations. Contrast to the factory farming small scaled farming and pastoralism do not use (up to their level best) pesticides and chemical fertilizers etc. They do not harm the nature by the blind use of inputs like energy and water. They are the custodians of the genes and nature.:
A summary key opportunities for livestock to contribute to the agroecological transition Livestock is found in…

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RESILIENCE OF NATIVE LIVESTOCK BREEDS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Originally posted on Communities' Animal Genetic Resources and Food Security :
The globe is under stressful pressure of climate change. Droughts, erratic and unseasonal rains, floods, and rise in mercury are the salient features of climate change. Some regions are under the severe…

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Camel Milk: Why Do You Need This In Your Home?

Originally posted on Communities' Animal Genetic Resources and Food Security :
via Camel Milk: Why Do You Need This In Your Home?

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A move away from ‘grain fundamentalism’ to higher quality milk, meat and egg calories to fight malnutrition

Originally posted on ILRI Clippings:
Derek Headey, a senior research fellow at the CGIAR’s International Food Policy Research Institute, yesterday published an opinion piece in The Telegraph on the importance of using milk, meat and eggs to fight malnutrition and…

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Next Brussels Briefing n. 53: ”The next generation of farmers: successes and new opportunities”

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How to Integrate New Chickens to a Flock

Originally posted on The Garden Smallholder:
There’s no going back once you’ve caught the chicken keeping bug. Apart from the obvious reason why people decide to keep them, chickens are great company in the garden, fun to watch and seriously addictive. With so many breeds…

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