PRESS RELEASE: @NAFDACAgency RESPONDS TO THE ABUSE AND MISUSE OF SNIPER (100 ml) PACK SIZE AND OTHER BRANDS OF AGRICULTURAL FORMULATIONS OF DICHLORVOS PRODUCTS

The National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) is gravely concerned about the recent trend in the abuse and misuse of 100ml of Sniper insecticide and other brands of Agricultural formulations of Dichlorvos to commit suicide. The other brands of the agricultural formulations of 100 ml pack size of dichlovos include: (Tankill, Gladiator Liquid, Executor Liquid, Smash Super Liquid, DD Force, Glovan, Philopest, Wonder Liquid, Rid-Off, NOPEST and SUMODDVP). These products are misused as household insecticide and direct misapplication on agricultural produce. The abuse and misuse of the 100ml of these products is associated with serious Public Health hazards such as cancer and respiratory disorder.

Sniper and other brands of Dichlorvos formulations are agricultural insecticides, registered for use as Crop Protection Product (CPP) only. The availability of this product in small retail pack sizes of 100ml and their sales in open-markets and supermarkets have made the product readily available for abuse and misuse as a household insect repellant, as an agent to control insect infestation in agricultural food and a tool for suicide in the Country.

NAFDAC Act Cap N1 LFN 2004 has mandated the Agency to regulate and control the importation, exportation, distribution, manufacture, advertisement, sales and use of drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, bottled water and chemicals, which includes Agrochemicals. In view of this, the Agency wishes to draw the attention of the general public to the regulatory measures and control put in place to arrest/mitigate this abuse and misuse of Sniper and other brands of Dichlorvos formulations meant for agricultural use as follows:

1. NAFDAC bans the importation and manufacture of 100ml pack size of Agricultural formulations of Dichlorvos with immediate effect.

2. NAFDAC bans with immediate effect hawking of all agrochemical formulations

3. NAFDAC is giving a two-month (up to 31st August 2019) notice to brand owners/distributors to withdraw their products from open markets and supermarkets that do not have garden corner/shelves to the agro dealer outlets. The sales of Sniper insecticide and other Dichlorvos brands in open markets and supermarkets nationwide are prohibited with effect from 1ST September 2019.

4. NAFDAC is giving a six-month moratorium up to 1st January 2020 for brand owners to exhaust the products that are in various accredited agro-input dealers (distributors/marketers/retailers) outlets.

5. Mandatory listing of Dealers (distributors/marketers/retailers) of agrochemicals. All NAFDAC formations are to collect the list to ensure continual monitoring of all agro dealers in their States.

6. The Agency has introduced permit to clear all bulk pesticides and agrochemicals. Importers/Manufacturers/marketers are advised to liaise with Veterinary Medicine and Allied Products Directorate or closest NAFDAC offices or visit the Agency website at https//www.nafdac.gov.ng for more information and guidance.

7. All NAFDAC formations are to commence enforcement on restriction of sales of crop protection products to NAFDAC listed and accredited agro-inputs dealers/distributors/marketers nationwide by 1ST April 2020.

8. NAFDAC advises the General Public to desist from the misuse of agricultural formulations of Dichlorvos as household insecticides, as such malpractice is associated with public health hazards.

9. The General public may wish to note that CropLife Nigeria in collaboration with NAFDAC has agreed to undertake the following: –

i. Mop-up of 100ml agrochemical formulation of Dichlorvos from open markets and supermarkets by importers, manufacturers and distributors and to be monitored by NAFDAC nationwide from 1st September 2019.

ii. intensify the continual evidence-based sensitization workshop on proper use and handling of pesticides and agrochemicals across the country.

iii. Provide antidotes against Dichlorvos poisoning in tertiary and secondary medical centers across Nigeria.

iv. The reformulation of all Dichlorvos preparation to include bitter agent and vomiting induce agent.

v. Training process of all agro dealers will commence from 1st September 2019

vi. Improved labeling, sealing and packaging to include amongst others the use of color band to differentiate World Health Organization (WHO) toxicity classification on all agrochemical and removal of pictorials of household pests from labels of agrochemicals/crop production products.

May I at this point call on all good citizens of our dear country to always adhere to all regulatory measures when handling or using NAFDAC regulated products. It is important to read carefully the label on the regulated products before using. The Agency is committed to safeguarding the health of Nigerians. The Agency seeks the cooperation of Nigerians in achieving the mandate of Safeguarding the health of the Nation.

NAFDAC…Customer-focused, Agency-minded

DG NAFDAC

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Celebrating World Zoonoses Day with a focus on ILRI’s research on zoonotic diseases

AgHealth

Taking sheep for disease testing in Bako, Ethiopia
Taking sheep for disease testing in Bako, Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Barbara Wieland).

World Zoonoses Day is
marked annually on 6 July to commemorate the day in 1885 when Louis Pasteur
successfully administered the first vaccine against a zoonotic disease when he
treated a young boy who had been mauled by a rabid dog. The day is also an opportunity
to raise awareness of the risk of zoonoses, infectious diseases that are spread
between animals and people.

Scientists estimate
that 60% of known infectious diseases in people and 75% of new or emerging
infectious diseases in people are transmitted from animals. Neglected zoonoses
associated with livestock, such as brucellosis and cysticercosis, impose a huge
health burden on poor people and reduce the value of their livestock assets.

Through its Animal and Human Health program, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) carries out research with national and international partners towards…

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CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health publishes 2018 annual report

AgHealth

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health 2018 annual report cover

The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) has published its 2018 annual report, highlighting program activities and research results from across A4NH’s five research flagships and five focus countries. These include:

  • research into consumer choices, motives and barriers through the lens of vegetable consumption in urban Nigeria;
  • building the evidence base with newly-published research that shows biofortified high-iron pearl millet can significantly improve nutrition and cognitive performance;
  • significant research contributions to help policymakers and consumers understand food safety issues and risks;
  • how agriculture and nutrition interventions delivered through community-based childcare centres can impact nutrient intake, dietary diversity and nutritional status;
  • improving hospital diagnostics for human brucellosis; and
  • an exploration of gender research projects being conducted under A4NH.

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Development policy and practice – a case study in disruptive innovations

ILRI news

By Eva Ohlsson and Boleslaw Stawicki 

A disease that was supposed to have been preventable by vaccine recently reemerged as a major killer of chicks in Kenya, seriously damaging the livelihoods of countless smallholder farmers and driving thousands of them out of the poultry business altogether. It wasn’t supposed to be this way: A vaccine for infectious bursal disease, an acute, highly contagious viral disease of young chickens, had been developed in the previous decade and raised hopes of someday eliminating the disease. Yet by the 2010s, it was becoming clear that the vaccine wasn’t nearly as effective as anticipated. In Kenya and elsewhere, whole flocks of vaccinated chicks were coming down with the disease; in some cases, mortality rates neared 100 percent.

Chickens require little in the way of space and start-up capital. Most poultry growers in Kenya are smallholder mixed livestock and crop farmers—and a majority of these…

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On a frugal continent of ‘economic vegetarians’, consuming more meat means longer, healthier lives—The Economist

ILRI Clippings

A slaughterhouse in Maputo, Mozambique (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

The Economist reports that the future of food lies in Africa. And why that’s a good thing. Read on to find out why.

As Africans get richer, they will eat more meat and live longer, healthier lives

‘. . . Between 1961 and 2013 the average Chinese person went from eating 4kg of meat a year to 62kg. Half of the world’s pork is eaten in the country. More liberal agricultural policies have allowed farms to produce more—in 1961 China was suffering under the awful experiment in collectivisation known as the “great leap forward”. But the main reason the Chinese are eating more meat is simply that they are wealthier.

In rich countries people go vegan for January and pour oat milk over their breakfast cereal. In the world as a whole, the trend is the other way.

‘In the decade…

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New report says investments in food safety in sub-Saharan Africa should prioritize the needs of local consumers

AgHealth

Locally made beef stew sold in Bagnon market at Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné).
Locally made beef stew sold in Bagnon market at Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire (photo credit: ILRI/Valentin Bognan Koné).

Donor investment in food safety in sub-Saharan Africa should have greater focus on the needs of consumers in Africa, according to a new report by the Global Food Safety Partnership.

The report, Food safety in Africa: Past endeavors and future directions, analysed donor investment in over 500 food safety projects undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa since 2010. It found that more than half of these projects were focused on overseas markets and less than half on consumers in sub-Saharan Africa, most of whom rely on informal food markets and bear the greatest health burden of unsafe food.

According to estimates from the World Health Organization, foodborne disease in Africa results in 137,000 deaths and 91 million cases of illness a year. Globally, foodborne disease has a public health burden similar to…

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New case study presents nine-year follow-up of pilot project to improve food safety in Bodija market, Nigeria

AgHealth

Goat in a market in Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).
Goat in a market in Nigeria (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

Foodborne disease is a major public health problem in poor countries, but we lack effective, sustainable and scalable approaches that work in the traditional, informal markets where most fresh, risky food is sold.

A promising intervention is working with informal sector vendors to provide training and technologies, an enabling environment, and motivation for behaviour change.

A case study published in the March 2019 issue of the journal Infection Ecology & Epidemiology presents a long-term follow-up of a pilot project to improve food safety in Bodija abattoir and meat market, one of the largest markets in Nigeria.

An evaluation shortly after implementation found the intervention was acceptable, cost-effective and resulted in safer meat. The follow-up nine years later used qualitative surveys and microbiological tests.

The policy environment had become disabling, partly because of attempts by the authorities to move butchers to…

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